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Review: Banff, Yoho & Kootenay National Parks Recreation Map and Visitor Guide from Clark Geomatics

This is a big map, packed with tons of content: charts, timelines, planning and wildlife viewing tips, 80 sights and attractions and more than 100 hikes. The main attraction is the beautiful, shaded relief map of Banff, Yoho & Kootenay National Parks, along with Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park and a few bits of Kananaskis Country, all at a scale of 1:250,000. There are at least three reasons to buy this map: It's a great resource if you're planning a trip to the Canadian Rockies. It makes a great souvenir. It offers ideas to foster your exploration and appreciation of the Canadian Rockies.

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Planning Tips for the 2017 Hiking Season

Popular hiking trails in Banff, Yoho and Kootenay National Parks are expected to be busier than ever in 2017, thanks to free national parks entry in celebration of Canada's 150th. Thanks to careful planning and trail selection, we're aiming for maximum enjoyment while exploring the Canadian Rocky Mountains this summer. Read on to take advantage of our top strategies and to get the inside scoop on our favourite hiking trails.

Stanley-Glacier

Hiking Kootenay National Park – Stanley Glacier

The Stanley Glacier hike in Kootenay National Park has a lot going for it: 1) less than two hours from Calgary (under an hour from Canmore) it's about the same travel time to/from as many of our favourite hikes deep in Kananaskis; 2) it's pretty easy; 3) fossils; 4) new and old growth forests; 5) Mount Stanley, Mount Storm and Mount Whymper; 6) waterfalls; 7) a hanging valley; and 8) Stanley Glacier! After our second trip up and down the trail, we added Stanley Glacier to our list of all-time favourites hikes.

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Photo Blogging Challenge – Black and White (August 2016)

I haven't done much black and white photography. But that changed thanks to this month's photo blogging challenge. I switched my digital camera to monotone mode; that camera processee the jpg files in black and white while leaving me with full colour RAW files for blogging, tweeting, etc. The other result from changing the picture mode to monotone is that everything seen through the EVF and on the LCD screen is in black and white. That really helped me focus on shape, form, lines, patterns, textures and other sources of tonal contrast - elements of composition that become particularly important when colour isn't part of the equation. The biggest thing I learned by doing this is that viewing a composition in black and white makes for stronger compositions; I think I'll use this mode on a semi-regular basis.

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Kootenay National Park – Marble Canyon

Our primary motivation in dragging unenthusiastic K to Marble Canyon after spending most of a day exploring for Burgess Shale fossils near Stanley Glacier was to collect the information needed to log the Marble Canyon earthcache. During our 30 minute walk along the Marble Canyon interpretive trail, we quickly realized that this stop holds broad …

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